Veneration for our veterans

Americans honor and celebrate veterans alive and deceased

Morgan McCormack, News Editor

Flags waving at half-mast, federal office closure, parades in the streets, an atmosphere of pride and remembrance in the air. All of these things can be seen and felt on November 11 every year.

Approximately 19 million veterans are recognized as heroes on November 11, also known as Veterans Day.

The holiday, initially known as Armistice Day, is a day in which American people pay tribute and show respect to all veterans, living and dead, who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces– both during times of war and times of peace.

However, be careful to not confuse Veterans with Memorial Day. Although both are similar in regards to their celebration, Memorial.  Day serves to honor the fallen while Veterans Day honors all veterans.

Veterans Day came to be a federal holiday after the Armistice with Germany went into effect on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

The year following the Armistice, on the first Armistice Day, President Woodrow Wilson said that “Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who die in the country’s service.”

While it was publically deemed a holiday, Armistice Day was not recognized as a legal holiday until 1938 through an act of Congress.

In 1954, the name of the holiday was changed from Armistice Day to Veterans’ Day by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in order to honor those who served in wars following World War I. If the first world war had actually been the “war to end all wars,” the holiday would most likely still be called Armistice Day.

This day of honor is typically celebrated by the closure of businesses, the flag being waved at half mast, religious service, two minutes of silence, and parades held to celebrate those who fought for our country.

There is also a service at Arlington cemetery, the home of approximately 400,000 graves of fallen soldiers.

The United States is not the only country that recognizes November 11 as a day of remembrance. Many English speaking countries also recognize this day, such as Canada and Australia, as Remembrance Day.

On November 11, America sits in remembrance and walks in celebration of those who fought for the country we live in.